ramblings of an optomistic spirit

21/01/2014

"intrigue" and weekend walks

We were going skiing but the weather was misty and rainy,so wrapping up warm we decided
to head out with the camera's. Saturday we explored an area we had never been to before
Loch Arkaig. A short trip in the car the road runs alongside the Caledonian Canal for a while.
Then on reaching the loch which is 12 miles long the road soon turns into a single lane track.
On researching the Loch on our return it revealed to great storys ? Hmmm wished I'd researched before we headed out.
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"October 3rd,1857. This morning my stalker and his boy gave me an account of a mysterious creature, which they say exists in Loch Arkaig, and which they call the Lake-Horse. It is the same animal of which one has occasionally read accounts in newspapers as having been seen in the Highland lochs, and of the existence of which in Loch Assynt the late Lord Ellesmere wrote an interesting article, but hitherto the story has always been looked upon as fabulous. I am now, however, nearly persuaded of its truth. My stalker, John Stuart, at Achnacarry, has seen it twice, and both times at sunrise on a bright sunny day, when there was not a ripple on the water. The creature was basking on the surface; he only saw the head and hind quarters, proving that its back was hollow, which is not the shape of any fish or of a seal. Its head resembled that of a horse.... The Highlanders are very superstitious about this creature. They are convinced that there is never more than one in existence at the same time, and I believe they think it has something diabolical in its nature, for when I said I wished I could get within shot of it, my stalker observed very gravely: 'Perhaps your Lordship's gun would miss fire.'"
 
On the west coast of Scotland is a famous 18th century treasure hoard known as the ‘Treasure of Loch Arkaig’ or ‘Jacobite Gold’. Only one bag of gold coins has ever been recovered and nobody has located the bulk of this real life treasure. If recovered, it would be worth over ten million pounds, but the historical value would be priceless.The story begins in 1746 when Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite army was massacred at the Battle of Culloden near Inverness. Charlie fled to the Western Isles and before news of his defeat reached France, two frigates; the Bellona and Mars, were loaded with hundreds of casks of brandy, medical supplies, guns and ammunition, and hidden below were seven large wooden caskets containing the payroll for Charlie’s Jacobite army and funds for his rebellion – hundreds of bags of gold coins, amounting to 1’200’000 livres.

On the 10th of May 1746, the Bellona and Mars sailed into Loch nan Umah near Fort William on Scotland’s west coast and unloaded the treasure. It was then transported about 20 miles overland and buried somewhere near Loch Arkaig. In September 1746, Prince Charles and his most loyal Jacobite supporters finally escaped to France and Macpherson of Cluny, chief of Clan Macpherson, retained control of the treasure. He famously lived in exile in the Scottish highlands for nine years and spent much of his time hiding out at a mysterious location known as Cluny’s Cave.

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Below some photos from Loch Arkaig.

















On the Sunday we stayed local Andy had previously spotted a rocky outcrop that would offer
a great photo oppotunity, although the light and weather conditions left alot to be disired we thought we would check it out for sunnier opportunities in the future.
So below a few photo's from Sunday taken at Rannoch Moor.


















We got back to the car and warmed up with hot coffee and chocolate gingerbread :-) 

5 comments:

  1. I love that road up through Glencoe, but so rarely seen it without cloud obscuring the mountain tops. Beautiful!

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    Replies
    1. living minutes away I do get to see it on the gloriously sunny days we do get. :-)

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  2. Sounds amazing, just love your photos.

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  3. Brilliant stories. I have very happy memories of holidays in Scotland and travelling across Rannoch Moor.

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Thanks for dropping by.......I love reading your comments ♥
Annie.